Katja Završnik (Slovenia)

Katja Završnik started dancing at the age of 5 and through the years studied various forms of dance such as Ballet, Jazz, Modern, Ballroom, Gymnastics and Acrobatic Rock and Roll for 9 years.

Since 2005 she has focused on early American dances from the Jazz age and Swing era, such as the Lindy Hop, Swing, Balboa, Charleston, St. Louis Shag and Authentic jazz. Her knowledge of (almost) all swing dances allows Katja to adapt her dance to any type of dancer. Which places her on the market among one of the best followers understanding connection and reactivity.

She is an elegant dancer. At first, you’ll be seduced by her style based by subtlety and finesse. But if you look a little closer you’ll be surprised by her musicality and footwork. Her focus on musicality and connection makes her one of the most sought after followers in the scene.

Her shyness – as probably her Slovenian origin as well – gives at first a “cold” feeling. But don’t make any mistake : she loves to laugh, to party and simply have fun. During a dance, she is one of the few followers to never refuse a dance and also often the last to leave the dance floor.

Currently living in Ljubljana, Slovenia, Katja travels doing special weekend workshops and festivals. In the past 9 years she has taught and performed all over Europe, Asia and USA.

Peter Winqvist Loggins (United States)

 

Peter Winqvist Loggins is Dance Historian and Musician based in New Orleans.

Peter has done hundreds of interviews the past 20 years, with the likes of ragtime dancers in NY, Charleston Champions of the 1920’s to National Champions 30’s through the 50’s, including State Champions of Swing dance.

Originally known for his research of early jazz and swing dance in California, and the owner of the Dean Collins’s archive and collection, this brought on other donators and researchers that have lead to other area’s of the United states.

Spending many years helping with the Savoy Ballroom and Lindy Hop research with Historian Terry Monaghan Allowed the possibility of working on projects with Frankie Manning both for the Heritage foundation in London As well as a national grant for the University of Idaho with the Lionel Hampton archive in Documenting Frankie’s Choreography.

In recent years the studies have been Nineteenth century origins of jazz, from a social approach based on Lawrence Gushee’s research, with a focus on African American influenced vernacular dance.

Today, Peter is moving to Sweden after spending the past 6 years living in the childhood home of Jelly Roll Morton, where he continued his research of early dance and music and has been sponsored by State department of cultural affairs the past 5 years.